How to identify a sycamore tree

Share on facebook
Share on pinterest
Share on linkedin
Share on email

Easy Tree ID > Tree Profiles > How to identify a sycamore tree

how to identify a sycamore tree

How do you identify a sycamore tree?

Wondering if you are looking at a sycamore tree? Your clues are their leaves, buds, flowers and seeds. Here’s what they look like at-a-glance:

sycamore leaf
sycamore buds
identifying flowering sycamore trees
identifying sycamore seeds, what are helicopter seeds

Sycamore tree facts

Hello! In today’s guide we are going to learn how to identify a sycamore tree. Are you ready? Let’s get started! Here are a few sycamore facts:

  • Common name: Sycamore
  • Latin name: Acer pseudoplatanus
  • Family: Sapindaceae

Sycamore trees can grow up to 35 meters tall, live for 400 years and can be found almost anywhere, in hedgerows, woodlands, riverbanks, parks and gardens.

sycamore leaf

Sycamore leaves

Sycamore leaves are palmate, with 5, toothed lobes, a red stem and slight down underneath.

sycamore buds

Sycamore buds

Their buds are oval and green with dark brown or black points.

identifying flowering sycamore trees

Sycamore flowers

Its flowers are small, green-ish yellow and dangle down in a raceme.

identifying sycamore seeds, what are helicopter seeds

Sycamore seeds

Sycamore seeds grow in closely held pairs, each with a single membranous wing.

Trees that look similar to sycamore

sycamore leaf

sycamore leaf

Norway maple leaf

Norway maple leaf

Norway maple

Norway maple leaves look similar to sycamore, but are larger, smoother and pointier.

identifying sycamore seeds, what are helicopter seeds

sycamore seed

identifying helicopter seeds - norway maple seed

Norway maple

Norway maple

The seeds of the Norway maple also look similar to sycamore, but are larger, more wavy and held further away from each other.

Sycamore tree uses

  • Bushcraft – Sycamore wood is strong and fine, making it great for carving
  • Wildlife – Sycamore is a valuable food source for a variety of moths, birds, small mammals and other insects.

Related posts

P.S. Looking for a Tree Identification Guide?

My Nature Nook

Hello, I’m Leila! I help aspiring herbalists to grow their nature knowledge and deepen their Nature connection. Learn more…

Share this page

Share on facebook
Share on pinterest
Share on linkedin
Share on email

Love my resources?

If you enjoy these resources and would love to be notified about new Nature Nook resources, posts and tutorials, you can subscribe to My Nature Nook by clicking the pink button below x

error: Content is protected !!
%d bloggers like this: